ILS-Curse album review.

ILS-Curse album review.

FFO: Sludgy, dirty, noisy punk/metal/garage tunes that will rock your world!.

This epic band from Portland is really what the world damn needs atm. No correction, absolutely anytime. The overall sound is made up of multiple genres, but their sound is utterly original and harks back to a time when independent bands produced sensationally diverse albums that weren't trend-driven. Over the last decade, we have seen the sharp rise of copycat bands that may be influenced by the greats, but frankly don't cut the mustard for long term repeated plays of their dull releases. And this goes for hardcore, metal, sludge, and mainstream music equally. Moving back to our loud and obnoxiously creative gods, ILS we can feel comfortable knowing that the mantle of music that rocks is in very safe hands. Curse is a damn special release, it combines sheer aggro with songs that are so well written-like catchy as fuck. There is a constant groove and rhymic tone that just grabs you-many grunge/stoner bands like Alice in Chains, Kyuss and Monster Magnet, etc had that sneaky hook that makes you remember the songs well after you have stopped listening. That's what I loved about this ripper album. It is a perfect combo of insane (but technically mindblowing) vocals with skin tearing riffs and rhythm to die for. Plus each track is on a different tangent to the predecessor and it can quickly move from sludgy depths to mathcore chaos, then back to an addictively catchy music festival-closing anthem. Yes, damn straight a classic album from start to end.

Highlights: the whole fucking album, seriously!.
Epic, noisy, damn crazy, and a perfect release to bang your head to. And categorically an album you will bounce back to frequently.

Out now on the frankly brilliant Pogo records (great label with awesome bands and owners):

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